Friday, July 17, 2015

Food Preserving Marathon!

Want to know what a 'food preserving marathon' looks like?  I'm in the midst of one ... it actually started last night ...

I didn't set out to do a 'food preserving marathon' but several good deals fell into my lap at the same time plus our regular garden harvesting ... the end result ...  lots to do before it ruins, hence a food preserving marathon became a necessity!

(This 'marathon' will last through tomorrow (Saturday) or until I run out of things to preserve!    I'll be adding to this post throughout the marathon so check back often!)


8 pints of pickled asparagus  (Thursday night)
We found asparagus on sale for $.99/lb and purchased enough to can these plus the dehydrator is humming with the end pieces.  When they're dried I'll grind them up into asparagus powder!


9 pints of navy beans (Friday morning)
I purchased the beans as part of our $5 or less pantry challenge here on A Working Pantry this week.



9 pints of sweet pepper mustard.  



I had some sweet peppers left over so I chopped them up using my manual food chopper and froze them in 1/4 increments to be used in soups, stews, casseroles and omelets.  But wait, I'm not through with those peppers yet, after I deseeded them, before chopping them up, I saved the seeds.  I'm going to label them with the info of what I know about them and plant them next year.  (The link to a manual food chopper similar to the one I have can be found at the bottom of the page.)


The asparagus ends finished drying and I ground them up using a spice/coffee grinder.  This will be used in soups, casseroles, etc.  (The link to the spice/coffee grinder I use can be found at the bottom of the page.)



We found blueberries on sale for $.99/carton and purchased enough to fill 5 freezer quart bags. I froze about half of them in 1/4 cup increments to be used in smoothies.




Our elderberries are starting to get ready for harvest and I had two bunches that were ready on Friday.  I harvested them, removed them from the stems, washed them and set them to drying in the dehydrator.  These will be used to make herbal remedies.


** This brings us to Friday night ... stay tuned for Saturday! **

Saturday p.m. ... Due to an unexpected event, I did not get to continue with my food preserving marathon today. I'll have to work the rest of it in as I have time.

I hope this entry has been helpful!


patsi


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17 comments:

  1. It is so wonderful to see those jars start adding up on the shelves.

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  2. I am doing the same thing this weekend. Tonight I will start on green beans, tomorrow will be peas and tomatoes, and Sunday will be blueberries and lima beans. Its hard work, but good work

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  3. I am so happy for you Patsi! It looks so good and your pantry will be bulging soon!
    Vicky

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    1. Thank you Vicky, a full pantry is a beautiful and comforting sight!

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  4. Hello! I am brand new here. What is your preferred way of canning those navy beans? Do you add anything to them before you can? Also I think I saw somewhere on your blog about vacuuming dry milk powder.......where do you find your powder at to get the best price? Thank you very much for your help.

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    1. Mary Ann, I pressure can navy beans and for this canning I added a half pod of cayenne pepper, a small piece of seasoning meat/bacon and a half teaspoon of salt to each pint jar. Yes, I do vacuum seal dry milk and I purchase it where ever I can find the best price. Since I primarily use it for cooking I'm not really concerned about the taste. Welcome to our little corner of the blogging universe!

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    2. I'm curious to know what you think the cost of each jar of beans is after you purchase them and pressure can them. I'm trying to see which is cost effective for me. I can buy a can of beans for .51 or a 1 lb bag of beans for 1.45. I haven't used my canner a lot and I probably need to take it somewhere and have it checked out. It always scares me a little bit to use it.

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  5. I would have never thought about using the ends of the of the asparagus to dehydrate and grind into a powder...thank you!

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  6. Way to go !! This week I have processed: Tuesday - 19 dozen ears of corn (64 as corn on the cob, 48 quart bags of creamed corn), Wednesday - 9 quarts and 1 pint of peaches, Thursday - 29 pints and 4 quarts of salsa and today: 4 pints and 1 half pint of lime pickles. Then I went outside and picked enough for another batch of salsa. That will have to wait until tomorrow.

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    1. Oh my Trudy! You have your own food preserving marathon going on! I think we'll both be ready for a day of rest after this!!!

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  7. I love canning and preserving and I enjoy your site.

    Here's a question for you. Although I have frozen and dried zucchini, I have never canned it. I worry that it would be mushy. Is it? Also, what do you do with it once canned? I don't want to go to that much work if my family won't eat the finished product:)

    With the frozen, I use it for baked goods and an occasional soup. With the dried, I throw it into vegetable soup during the last few minutes and it plumps up a bit, but is not mushy.

    Our bushes are going crazy with yellow, green and round ball zucchini. I'm going to stuff a few of the ball ones in the next few days for a main dish. I have also made cheesy zucchini soup, zucchini bread, foccocia bread with zucchini on top (with youngest child), and stir fry. I have also frozen several cartons and fed a bunch to the chickens. But, there is more coming. Last summer, I made some zucchini relish. I may do that again.

    Thanks

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    1. Becky, I get this question about canning squash quite often! I used to have the same questions until I started canning it and now it is my preferred method. Is it mushy? It is soft, but not mushy (If you use young firm squash the outcome will be better.). What do you do with it? I use it in casseroles (it makes a delicious squash and cheese casserole) and in squash fritters.

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  8. Patsy, great job! I've done those kinds of marathon canning days! You will so enjoy all your hard work this winter! Teri

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    1. Teri S, it is nice to see the pantry filling up, it brings peace and security for the coming winter.

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