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This is Why! part 6

Previous entries can be found HERE . Thus far we’ve talked about how I use leftovers to help stock my pantry, how I shop to fill my...

Monday, June 5, 2017

Disaster Preparedness Class #7

(This picture is just one of many scenes of Huricane Matthew's devestation to our area that I'll be sharing throughout this class.  I do not remember where I got this picture so I can't give credit.  I took many photos myself and others were shared with me so please understand if I can't give the proper credit for each photo I'll be sharing.)

You are finally able to get out of your neighborhood and it surely does feel good.  You drive around in a neighboring neighborhood looking at the damage trying to avoid the roads that are closed.  By weaving in and around side streets you find yourself in an area where you don’t feel comfortable.  Suddenly, people are coming out of their houses toward the road you’re on.  They are lining the street and all that you can see are them using their cell phones and more people joining them , then some of them start surrounding your vehicle … how are you feeling, what are you going to do?

While you’re out you decide to try and find some gas to purchase. The only place that has gas is limiting the amount you can purchase, has a long line and is only accepting cash, what are you going to do?

On your way back home you pass a grocery store.  There is a sign on the door telling everyone that they do not have power, stock is limited to non-perishables in the store and only cash is being accepted.  Do you go in and purchase anything?

patsi
She looketh well to the ways of her household … Proverbs 31:27


17 comments:

  1. First, as a single female who only moved to this area a year ago, I would be extra cautious about driving streets that I am unfamiliar with. My path would likely take me to streets where friends live and past stores I frequent. IF I were to find myself surrounded by a group of strangers, I would find it exceedingly frightening, and I'd do everything in my power to flee the area, pedal to the floorboards. I am not a person who uses a debit card to pay for everything; paying cash would not be an issue, at least short term. If I did go into a store, it would likely be to look for bottled water and pet food, as that's what I'd expect to run out of first. Because it is unknown how long this stiuation will last, I would be very judicious with my spendnig. If it was a store where I frequent and know staff, I may attempt to barter time for goods / part of the cost of goods, so they could address family needs of their own.

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  2. I'd only send an armed big strong menacing looking male out to do this sort of exploring--with cash.

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  3. I'd feel extremely nervous about being surrounded in my car. I'm not quite sure what I'd do. I don't think I'd venture out just to drive around and observe the damage. If I was out, it would be with my husband and only to get something I really needed or to help one of the family. We usually have extra gas for our mowers so I'd use that first. As for groceries, I probably would have to go out for more water but I am going to order some more 19 litre containers so that I wouldn't have to do that. I did get a first aid kit for the house and two mini ones for our cars. I also found a 'life straw' which is a kind of personal water filter. Apparently you can use it to drink out of lakes, streams and ponds, and it filters out anything that would make you sick. We have a small pond on our property, so the life straw could help us out in a prolonged emergency. It was only $ 20, a good investment I think.

    Marney

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    1. Marney, I've heard some really good things about Lifestraws.

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  4. I also have the Life Straw, and yes, it was $20. I'm thinking I should have bought two, but my thought was my husband and I could share. I should get one for his bug out bag--which by the way is more for supplies in case we would have to go to a shelter (change or two of clothing, toiletries, etc.) We also keep our car gas tanks topped off, I don't let mine get any lower than half empty. Last year I visited with an emergency response individual for our town and asked him how prepared our town officials were for an extended emergency. He says they learn from other towns that have experienced disasters and he also said that if area roads were blocked or unusable, supplies could be flown in to our local airport. It's about two miles to the airport--we are in a small town.

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    1. Joy, you are fortunate that your town has that option. For our area getting to the people out in the county was a real issue. Some had to be reached by boat. It was a real mess!

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  5. We live in a rural area of a rural state so being surrounded by many unknown people wouldn't happen. It wouldn't have flooded here, but we could have been without power for an extended time. This has happened before with snow, ice, and wind storms. Some in winter, some in summer.

    I'm sure my husband and I would be out driving around, out of curiosity and also to check on some neighbors. If a group came out of their homes, we'd probably stop and talk with them! It's a small town and we know most of the people so we wouldn't be feeling afraid. It seems like we live at the end of the world, but it's also quite safe. However, if we were in the above situation I wouldn't be out without my husband, and we'd be careful where we were going. Hopefully we'd be able to turn around and quickly leave. I'm sure I'd be nervous in that situation.

    We usually have gas stored for emergencies, but if we needed some, we would get in line and wait to get some. Unless the stores have had fresh supplies brought in, there's probably nothing left that I really need/want so I probably wouldn't bother going in there. We usually have plenty stored ahead.

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    Replies
    1. It was most definitely a nerve racking situation and one that I don't ever want to repeat again! Just saying ...

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  6. Like others have said, I'm not going to be out driving around just to see what everything looks like. I'd be with my hubby and son as well and we would stay out of any questionable areas.

    We would have filled all our vehicles up with gas before the big storm hit so probably no need to get any gas, but if we did we have cash for that. Also probably would not need anything from the store other than more water and maybe some powdered milk if they had any. I have cash so no problem paying.

    Shelliajean

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    1. Shelliajean, you sound like you are really prepared! Good for you!

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  7. I didn't know you were describing your own experience... Question: what denomination(s) of cash was the store owner accepting?

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    1. Joy, My family and I experienced everything I've written about in these disaster preparedness classes or know someone who did. I am teaching from experience. The store owner accepted cash only, small bills and change.

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    2. Patsi, $20 bills or smaller?

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  8. We had enough gas in the tank that we could have gone home and back to town, if needed, but we decided to stop and top off the tank, since we don't know when we'll have the opportunity again. Dad always carries cash and my sister an I also have a stash of cash that we can contribute if he runs low.

    When we pass the grocery store, we decide not to wait in another line. If they had bottled water, it would have been nice to get some, but our current system is working. We decide to save our cash and leave the limited supplies for those in worse situations that ours.

    -Susan O.

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  9. Would rather not go out unless really needed and then only with hubby and dogs. We are getting low on fresh water so that's the only reason we would go out.

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