Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Frugaling-Up In a Different Kind of Way!

I've always been a bargain hunting, sale shopping, frugal kind of person, but lately I've been looking at taking my frugalness up a notch by wringing everything out of what we have that I can.  Yesterday's post on our carrot harvest is an example. I used not only the carrot itself, but the peelings and tops as well.  Even the discarded parts that were ragged and in bad condition were  utilized by adding them to my compost bin where they'll turn into next year's compost. 
While I've always had this kind of mentality to a certain extent, I'm really trying to up my frugal game in this area by finding a use for everything and not wasting anything.

As is the norm for me when I want to improve in an area, I started pulling from my resources, here are four books that I'm currently re-reading with a different kind of frugal eyes ...


The Desperate Years by James D. Horan

The Tightwad Gazette by Amy Dacyczyn is another one I plan to revisit.

Update:  Here's the link to Jes's e-book, 100+ DIY Projects to Make with Fruit Scraps mentioned in the comments below.

What 'frugal books' can you recommend (not websites or blogs or anything that would require online access, I'm looking for something I can hold in my hands and refer back to as often as needed)?

Thanks in advance!

patsi

A Working Pantry

She looketh well to the ways of her household … Proverbs 31:27

Items I use in keeping my pantry well-stocked:

Dehydrator

Dehydrator Teflon Sheets

Dehydrator Cookbook

Food Saver

Herb/Coffee Bean Grinder

Manual Food Chopper

Pressure Canner

Canning Supplies

Food Scale

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16 comments:

  1. I like the books by Steve and Annette Economides.

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    Replies
    1. Susan, yes, they have some good books too! Thanks for the reminder!

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  2. It is amazing how much there is to learn. I love to find new ways to save! Jes' book on things to make from Fruit scraps was wonderful. Seeing things in a new light is interesting. I get excited to make new discoveries! I will tell you a recent one. Countless times I have found old chicken eggs that I just know would be rotten. Well they have a use! Currently I have about 18 bantam eggs that would be yuk as neither of my bantam hens hatched chickens. So tomorrow these eggs will be spaced in a garden bed then covered with soil as I need to top that bed up by about 6 inches. These are great garden fertiliser. Also if you have a fish tank the water out of that is great fertiliser!
    There are possibilities I haven't even thought of!

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    1. Annabel, yes, Jes' book is fabulous and that's the kind of thing I'm really trying to focus in on. That's a great idea for the bantam hen eggs ... I'll have to remember that when we have questionable eggs!

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    2. I have never heard of Jes' book I looked on amazon and nothing came up.

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    3. Lisa, I added the link to Jes' book in the blog post.

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  3. I am rereading Money Secrets of the Amish by Lorilee Craker. It's the extra push I occasionally need.
    Judy

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    1. Judy, yes, that's another good one. I need that extra push from time to time also, that's why I like to have resources I can hold in my hand to refer back too.

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  4. I have learned a lot from Tamara Adler's book "The Everlasting Meal", also a book called Scrappy Cooking. "We had Everything But Money" tells stories about the great depression and is a good read. "The Victory Cookbook" is another one I have. Our aim is to have no food waste. Bonnie Hunter's books on scrap quilting are also favorites of mine so that I have no fabric waste.

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    1. Cookie, Those are some good suggestions and I love that you included not wasting fabric as well. I'm a fan of Bonnie Hunter's scrap quilting too!

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  5. A comment on yesterdays post and choppers only lasting a year. I have had the Mueller chopper for several years and have not had to replace it. There was a recall on it last year and they sent me a new one but the one I had been using is still going strong so I just tucked the new one away for later. It is only about $5 more than the Vidalia brand chopper.

    The 'More with Less Cookbook' is a great reference for inexpensive recipes and they have all been very good. My very favorite from the book is the French Lettuce Salad recipe which is a delicious salad and so inexpensive.

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    1. Lana, I broke my chopper yesterday so I'm going to take a look at the Mueller, thank you for the suggestion! I have the 'More with Less Cookbook' and will have to look up that salad! Thank you!

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    2. I have gone through several choppers like the one you use Patsy but the Mueller one is awesome a real workhorse. I still have the first one I bought. I highly recommend it.

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    3. Lisa, I broke mine yesterday and am going to order the Mueller asap. Thank you!

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  6. My go-to book, when I'm feeling the need to get back on track and I start thinking about the dreams I once had to homestead, is Back to Basics. That book has so much good information in it, including some great recipes, planting advice, and more.

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    Replies
    1. Lori, oh yes, that is a good one! I need to pull it off my book shelf and reacquaint myself with it! Thanks for the reminder!

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