Saturday, January 20, 2018

From the Archives: Canning Collard Greens

For those of us who preserve collard greens, December and early January are prime times to choose your method of preservation and get it done!

Our preferred method is to can them.  Here's how we 'get it done' ..

Canning Collard Greens


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patsi
She looketh well to the ways of her household … Proverbs 31:27


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7 comments:

  1. I've never known anyone to can collard greens, but why not?? We have frozen them before, after they were cooked. Such a treat to pull out an already seasoned bag of greens to just reheat!

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    1. Little Penpen, the collards are so good canned too! It is definitely a 'heat and eat' side dish for us that we enjoy!

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  2. Dear Patsy,
    We like greens! Sometimes we use a tiny bit of vinegar that we have soaked small peppers in to sprinkle on top of them. Does it take quite a few leaves to make a jar? If the pot in your tutorial is full of leaves, how many jars would you say that makes? Thanks.
    Love, Kelsey

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    1. Kelsey, we keep a quart jar of 'pepper vinegar' in the refrigerator that I make every year and replenish throughout the year as needed. My husband puts on his greens. The pot in the tutorial is a HUGE pot and I do mean HUGE. I honestly don't know how many it takes as we just keep adding the leaves as they wilt down until the pot is full. We usually get about 21 quarts from the pot when it is full of wilted down greens.

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    2. Thanks, Patsy!

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  3. I've never used collard greens very much, but had some lately that were tasty. So, I ordered a package of seeds and will try to grow some this next summer. I will see if we like them before I can or freeze any. Aren't they pretty winter hardy? I have pretty mild winters here. Maybe they would overwinter like chard and then I wouldn't have to do anything except pick them. Do you know?

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    1. Becky, our winters are pretty mild too so we plant them in the fall and harvest them in December and January after the first frost. There are several types of collards, we grow the 'cabbage' collard varity.

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